A Shift in Time

Time has been on my mind these past few days. Because this chemotherapy cycle started on Monday instead of Saturday, my perception of it is all over the place. I keep having to think in terms of where I would be up to in my normal timeframe… “Ok, so today is my Tuesday. I don’t usually run until at least Wednesday and regularly struggle to get out of bed until that same day, so I need to try and relax today.” This is the sort of logic I am knocking around in my mind. It is throwing my week off considerably, as I keep thinking it is the wrong day and finding myself confused at feeling a certain way still. For example, today was my first injection day, but this usually falls on a Tuesday. It may sound minor if you haven’t been on chemotherapy before, but you establish certain routine behaviours and expectations. I usually expect to start picking up by the following Saturday, for example, but in this cycle that will be the following Monday instead.

I was sent the medical report from my oncology team to submit to work yesterday, on Wednesday. This report is to help support a case that I can return to work on a reduced number of hours. On Monday, whilst at chemotherapy, I received a call from my specialist to discuss it. He wanted to ensure that he was not only supporting me in what I wanted but also confirming that he agreed with the things being stipulated regarding the return to work. He did not want to support a position he viewed as untenable or unsuitable. “Are you absolutely sure you want to return to work?” he asked at one point. It is an interesting question. I’ve thought about it a lot since he asked it so straightforwardly. Especially so given everything else he spoke to me about – the continuing treatment, the changing of circumstances depending on how well received the treatment is, and the seriousness of the type of cancer I’m dealing with. He did also state that keeping my brain engaged is important, though, and that having more financial stability is also important if it is worrying me. It certainly has been. I do feel ready to try and return to work, I think. The only way to find out is to do it, anyway.

Excitedly, I opened the report as soon as I saw the email. I’ve been chasing it for a few weeks, so it genuinely was exciting to receive it. Not one to take my own advice regarding not Googling things, I saw the phrase ‘locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas (pancreatic cancer)’ and immediately headed over to Google. Every time I see ‘locally advanced’ written, I already feel a jolt of uncomfortable reality strike me in my stomach. For some reason, I get into a routine with the chemotherapy, where I manage to get back to running a few times a week, and feeling more ‘normal’ the further away from treatment day I am, and I stroll into a mental complacency. Everything will be alright; how could I feel this normal if it wasn’t going to be? The phrase ‘locally advanced’ bites back against that confidence – maybe I’m not so safe after all, I start to think. I don’t know why as I’ve known my cancer is locally advanced since being diagnosed, but you always want your cancer to be staged in the best possible way for your survival; mine isn’t.

The part that I googled was ‘adenocarcinoma’. I’d heard this word said a few times in the hospital, and have seen it written a few times too, but I had no concept of what it was, really. From my brief Googling, I believe it is where the cancer begins in the mucus duct, and it seems fairly common in pancreatic cancer with one website saying 85% of cases are due to it. I was quickly put off divulging too deeply into the topic, however, by the list of phases accompanying it – all very common when Googling Pancreatic Cancer, unfortunately. ‘Deadliest cancers’, ‘10% of pancreatic cancer survivors alive 5 years after diagnosis’ etc etc. You’d think I’d have a thick shell to it all by now, but it got to me. I started to cry for the first time in a while. Sometimes it’s good to experience these emotions, I guess, but it’s also nice to know that this was the first time I’ve experienced them in a while.

I delved straight into my sad music catalogue as a form of catharsis. Julien Baker has plenty of songs that meet the profile nicely. ‘Something’ seems to be the song that has stuck as I’ve been frequently listening to it over the last 2 days. Despite clearly being about a relationship breaking down, it has a few lines that stick out in my mind. I wanted to draw on them and discuss them in context of my situation.

Julien Baker – Something

“The walls of my skull bend backwards
And in like a labyrinth”

As I sat reading about adenocarcinoma, I felt a sensation in my head that I feel Julien demonstrates here really nicely. A pressure builds up in my head that becomes unbearable when I try and contemplate too much of what is going on at the same time. It’s Ok when I manage to compartmentalize it, but when too much information hits my mental at once, it all becomes overwhelming. My mum happened to walk into the room as I sat with the pages open on my laptop. She asked me if I was Ok and that is when I started to cry. There was a lot of information going through my head. Everything felt hopeless all of a sudden, and I couldn’t find a way to decrease the tension building in my head.

The idea of it being a labyrinth, not allowing any escape for those negative thoughts, getting lost within the walls and not allowing them to be processed, sits so nicely with how I was feeling. It has happened to me a lot of times during this life-changing experience. I remember a similar sensation happening as the doctor delivered the final diagnosis, whilst I sat on the hospital bed trying to contemplate the words. Hearing my mum and Anna break down into tears around me, whilst trying to focus on what he was saying to me. Trying to determine how serious the diagnosis was, trying to hold myself together whilst feeling the people around me suffer. It was hard.

I knew I was wasting my time
Keep myself awake at night
Whenever I close my eyes
I’m chasing your tail lights

These lyrics really speak to the hopelessness I briefly mentioned earlier. For some reason, I started getting a feeling on Monday evening that my treatment was hopeless, and that I was engaged in a losing battle. I’m not sure why as these lines of thought seldom come to me – I really do manage to stay positive most of the time.

The lines ‘Whenever I close my eyes, I’m chasing your tail lights’ really nicely illustrate the feelings I had towards the cancer at that moment, as I sat speaking to Anna on Facetime. It felt like I was 2 steps behind it, only identifying it from behind and never getting in front of it. That is the problem with being a patient, surrounded by specialists in a field that you have very little understanding of. You sometimes wonder if you have really understood the diagnosis, and worry that the medical team are either shielding information from you or haven’t managed to communicate it in a way that would allow you to understand. This has been much less of a problem since being at The Christie as I feel a huge amount of trust in my team there, but it doesn’t stop me from misunderstanding things that are said to me.

Sometimes I feel confident that I understand my diagnosis, but it only takes a word such as ‘adenocarcinoma’ and you’re back to feeling vulnerable. In reality, I probably walk a line between reality and delusion – reality kicks harder when the more difficult aspects of the treatment are prominent, and delusion sets in during the better periods. In a good cycle, I can run 27 miles in a week, go out for dinner a few nights and feel relatively normal (other than the catalogue of drugs I have to take to reach that normality). On a bad cycle, though, it is quite the opposite; getting out of bed can be difficult, and I spend much of my time fighting the sickness and trying to sleep off nausea. These are the more palatable side effects and those who have read through my Chemotherapy Diaries series will likely understand more about the unpalatable ones.

I just let the silence swallow me up
The ring in my ears tastes like blood

Again, these lyrics likely mean something else to the artist but very specifically appeal to the effects of the chemotherapy to me. A metallic taste in the mouth, similar to the taste of blood, lingers badly for a few days during and after my treatment. This concept of a blood taste in the mouth, coupled with the idea of silence swallowing me up, ring so true to my experience of the first few days after treatment. A friend of mine who survived cancer used the term ‘Chemotherapy Fog’ earlier. It’s a nice way of describing it. I usually spend a lot of my time in bed for the first few days after treatment, in and out of sleep and struggling to draw a line between consciousness and reality. I have to eat strong mints constantly to get rid of the metallic taste in my mouth as it makes me feel extremely sick. The time spent alone in bed, shifting in and out of consciousness, can put me in a very strange headspace. Sometimes it really does feel like the silence is swallowing you up, and you experience some of the lowest moments when you’re alone with your thoughts and in this vulnerable period. I’ve also experienced some of the most positive breakthroughs in these moments alone, though. I find myself needing space to process information and get my head in the necessary places to keep fighting through the harder times. You’re constantly left to the whims of your vulnerability, and it can take you either way.

If you enjoy the song above, I really recommend checking out the whole of the below Tiny Desk Concert by the artist. She has an incredible way of layering the guitar and creating the most impressive soundscapes, whilst delivering an overwhelming amount of emotion in her performance. I remember the first time I watched it and the whole video had me totally immersed from start to finish. The second song, Funeral Pyre (or ‘sad song number 12’ as she refers to it during the video) is particularly haunting.

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